Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions About Assisted Living & Senior Retirement Communities

Making a Successful Transition

Making the decision to surround your loved one with trained professionals who meet their needs is a selfless act. It is important you understand you will still be involved in medication and level of care concerns and no one lights up your loved one’s life like you, so visit often and cherish those moments.

Bridge to Better Living understands the difficulties to place yourself or loved one in another’s care is a complex choice. There are many factors to consider. We are the resource to help you make the decision on your specific wants and needs. It is important to understand you will still be involved in medication and level of care concerns. You light up your loved ones life, so visit often and cherish those moments.

Assisted Living provides residents with ‘assistance’. It is offered for those who are in need of help with one or more ADL’s (Activities of Daily Living, e.g., bathing, dressing, mobility, eating, medication, and hygiene). Residents may receive as much or little help as they wish since Assisted Living is family, physician, and resident driven. A nurse (RN or LPN) is available around the clock, but not always physically in the building. CNAs and CMAs are staffed 24/7. Payment options are private pay, long term care insurance and some VA benefits. It is often said if you “look at one Assisted Living, you have looked at ONE Assisted Living.” Choosing a transition consultant to understand your needs and wants helps to ensure you know the differences. Assisted Living is regulated by the State and not the Federal Government, therefore enabling each Assisted Living to be unique.

Assisted Living is regulated by the state, not the Federal government. Residents are generally not safe to live independently at home and need medical assistance. A physician order is needed to live in Assisted Living. Assisted Living provides three meals a day and apartments generally do not have a stove, although many have a small refrigerator and a microwave. Normal costs to the consumer are room and board and may include additional fees for levels of care. Medical staff is on site 24/7, although RNs/LPNs may not be. Medication is administered by qualified staff unless a resident is able to prove they are capable of managing their own medication.

There are many reasons why a parent should not remain at home. Primary indications when it is time to begin looking at Assisted Living options are:

  • Parent is a fall risk
  • Neglects to eat or have proper nourishment
  • Not taking medications properly
  • Personal hygiene is neglected
  • Parent hallucinates
  • Begins to trust strangers
  • Begins to wander
  • Withdraws from social activities, friends and family

Every family approaches the conversation differently. Beginning the dialogue is much easier early on in the aging process asking “What if?” and “How would you like?” Comparing testimonials from other acquaintances or family is a good conversation starter. Inviting a transition consultant is beneficial in explaining different retirement communities, cost and services/amenities. If your parents are needing immediate placement and you are unable to approach them, enlist the help of their physician and transition consultant.

Apartment availability varies at Retirement Communities. It is a good idea to tour with a transition consultant to narrow down choices before an immediate need arises. A refundable waiting list deposit is advisable to increase the opportunity of having a move-in ready apartment when needed. If you are called with an available opening, there is an option to decline. Finding an apartment during a crisis is difficult and lacks choices. Your name will remain at the top of the list. Finding a room at the time of a crisis is difficult and lacks choices.

If around the clock care is needed to remain safely at home, Assisted Living is more cost effective. Home Health Care is a good option if there is minimal assistance needed, perhaps a few hours per day or week. As time progresses, it is important to remember home may no longer be safe.

A Bridge to Better Living transition consultant assists from first consultation until the new client moves and they feel at home. We help people of all ages find the right independent, memory assisted, or long term care community for their loved ones. Bridge to Better Living is designed to remove the guess work and lessen the time and frustration from the process of finding a community—for you, a loved one, or a friend. It is critical you have one-on-one support to help guide and transition you through this difficult process. We do the investigating, the so-called leg work, and provide you with your options. Our goal is to meet your needs by connecting you to the best retirement community. We also help bridge the gap that often occurs between family members making these difficult choices. Having everyone in agreement ensures a smooth transition. All services are provided at NO COST to the client or clients.

Assisted Living Transition Consultants | Placement with Passion | Bridge to Better Living
Assisted Living Transition Consultants | Placement with Passion | Bridge to Better Living

Independent Living has many choices including square footage, floor plans, garages, transportation, meals, laundry facilities, fitness rooms and social activities. Independent Living allows a resident to choose and engage in social activities. A transition consultant is available to discuss additional amenities and services.

Independent Living is private pay only. In most cases Assisted Living and Memory Assisted Living require one to two years of private pay. This includes Long Term Care Insurance or benefit programs. A family needs to plan ahead to ensure financial security for their parents.

Yes, there are care choices; it is driven by the family, resident and each community will determine if they are able to meet the needs of the resident. Assisted Living is regulated by the state, not the Federal government. Its residents are generally not safe to live independently at home and need medical assistance. A physician order is needed to live in Assisted Living. Assisted Living provides three meals a day and apartments generally do not have a stove, although many have a small refrigerator and a microwave. Normal costs to the consumer are room and board and may include additional fees for levels of care. Medical staff is on site 24/7, although RNs/LPNs may not be. Medication is administered by qualified staff unless a resident is able to prove they are capable of managing their own medication.

The different types of Assisted Living (regulated by state) and Memory Assisted Living (regulated by state), Long Term Care, once known as nursing homes (regulated by federal).

Medicare will not pay for assisted living costs. However, in certain circumstances it may pay for medical care service received in Assisted Living.

Long-term care policies vary from one plan to another, so it is best to consult with your financial advisor.

Assisted Living and Assisted Memory Care may or may not accept Medicaid.

Yes, residents are able to retain their apartment as long as monthly payment is made.

In Assisted Living, a resident will have all their daily living needs met. Other services may include and are not limited to: three meals a day, transportation, housekeeping, laundry and trained staff in the facility at all times. Other amenities may or may not include: laundry assistance, individual climate control, activities, transportation, fitness rooms, storage areas and kitchenettes. It is helpful to visit with a transition consultant to discuss what is important.

Each Retirement Community is unique in its philosophy, culture, financial options and lifestyle choices. A transition consultant is able to discuss in depth the comparisons between the different communities without bias.

Federal law requires an RN to be present in Long Term Care facilities 24/7. In Assisted Living and Memory Care Assisted Living, state regulations require an RN or LPN to be available 24/7. Independent Living may or may not have medical personnel available.

Yes. Every community requires a lease. The leases vary according to each community. A transition consultant is able to be with you when reviewing the lease.

No, usually the entrance fee may or not be refundable.

All communities offer a type of alert system, including pull cords, pendant necklace or bracelet and motion detectors.

Assisted Living Transition Consultants | Placement with Passion | Bridge to Better Living
Assisted Living Transition Consultants | Placement with Passion | Bridge to Better Living

Yes, you are encouraged to bring personal belongings to make a home like atmosphere. It is encouraged to bring personal belongings to make home-like atmosphere. A transition consultant is able to give insight on furniture choices and placement as they have seen many different approaches to floor plans. A transition consultant is able to refer other services specializing in helping people “right size” to their new living home.

Visiting hours vary. Families are usually given entrance codes or a key fob for entry when community is secured.

Activities at Retirement Communities are designed to meet the needs of residents. Crafts, exercise classes, card playing, Bible study, travelogues, movie nights are a few of the choices. Weekly trips are arranged for activities outside the community including, shopping, entertainment and special events. It is important a resident is offered activities which engage them physically, socially, and mentally.

Transition Consultants maintain connections with clients to reassure the move is going smoothly and their needs are being met.

Yes, most communities offer transportation at no charge at no fee.

Have More Questions? We Have More Answers!

Contact Bridge to Better Living’s Transition Consultants today for more information on finding the right Assisted Living arrangements for your loved one.